St. Paul restricts off-campus housing near University of St. Thomas

September 26, 2012 § Leave a comment

The St. Paul City Council approved a new ordinance in June that restricts off-campus student housing near the University of St Thomas. The ordinance requires that any new student rentals within a certain area be at least 150 feet from other rentals – an attempt to limit the density of rental properties near the campus.

Homeowners in the surrounding neighborhoods with stately, historic homes are affected by the increase in student rentals and the student activity that comes along with it. Density issues around St. Thomas stretch back to 1999 when neighbors cranked up complaints about “campus sprawl.” Their concerns also included demolitions and expansions near the campus. An effort to pass citywide zoning restrictions failed in 2003.
Nearly 6,000 undergraduates enroll at St. Thomas every year. Of those, 43 percent live on campus. Of the 3,300 living off campus, roughly half live in housing near the school.

Councilman Chris Tolbert said “We live in a city and when you live next to a university, you will see students.” He doesn’t like the message the ordinance sends to students and is concerned the new limits would drive up rents. Councilman Dan Bostrom was troubled that the change would remove competition from the rental market, but he also said he understands the neighborhood concerns.

Renters Warehouse (Minnesota) named Best Places to Work 2011 in the small business category! Second straight year!

July 8, 2011 § Leave a comment

Hayden & Co. dba Renters Warehouse has been selected for the 2011 Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal Best Places to Work in the Small Companies category. This is the 13th year of honoring businesses. The Best Places to Work honorees also will be recognized at a luncheon on Thursday, August 18, 2011 at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. The 55 winning companies, determined by anonymous employee surveys compiled by Omaha, Neb.-based Quantum Workplace, will be ranked by their scores and featured in a special section of the Business Journal on Aug 19, 2011.

For Renters Warehouse this is their second time being selected for this great honor. They were selected in 2010 and are excited to make it three years in a row next year. CEO Brenton Hayden states “”Renters Warehouse really is unique. We are all great friends and great colleagues here. To have a staff so loyal to my customers and the business is so rare; I really do have the best team in Minnesota! I’m completely honored to win this award once again!”

Renters Warehouse enjoys thanking its employee’s for their dedicated work. Recently Renters Warehouse took all of their employees at the company as well as the employee’s spouses or guests out on a Lake Minnetonka Boat Tour with dinner. Renters Warehouse feels that their employee’s spouses and family are an important part of the continued success of the company. Director of Leasing Jesse Evans states “Renters Warehouse is the most enjoyable place I have ever had the pleasure of working at.  Renters Warehouse encourages a corporate culture that is fun and feels like a family.” Renters Warehouse also provides their employees with ongoing tickets to concerts and sporting events. They have a company event planned for their employees in honor of winning Best Places to Work 2011.

Renters Warehouse is extremely proud to know that their employees enjoy their work atmosphere. A more enjoyable workplace leads to employees who stay dedicated to their job and reduces turnover. Without employees a company is not successful and Renters Warehouse goes to great lengths to ensure their employee’s enjoy their work. Being selected for Best Places to Work for two years in a row is a great honor and something not only current employees appreciate, but something for future employees to look forward to.

To read the news article about the 2011 Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal Best Places to Work honoree visit: http://www.bizjournals.com/twincities/news/2011/07/08/best-places-to-work.html

To learn more about Renters Warehouse and residential property management visit: http://www.renterswarehouse.com/

What states require a real estate license to be a property manager?

July 1, 2011 § Leave a comment

States License Requirements For Residential Real Estate Leasing and Property Management

IMPORTANT: This information is intended for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should it be considered legal advice or relied upon without first confirming its contents with your state real estate commission. Laws are updated frequently, and this information may not reflect the current law in your state. To confirm the specific requirements for each state, please contact your state real estate commission. The author of this article was http://allpropertymanagement.com. For more information on how to find a local property management company, please visit them online. Check out Renters Warehouse about property management franchise opportunities.

 

  1. Alabama- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, engages in the lease or rental of real estate in Alabama, who offers real estate for rent or lease or who negotiates the rental or leasing of Alabama real estate. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities. A real estate license is not required of persons acting as the manager for an apartment building or complex.
  1. Alaska- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, engages in the lease of real estate in Alaska, who offers real estate for rent or lease, who collects rent for the use of real estate or fees for property management, or who practices or who negotiates to practice property management. AS 08.88.161. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.
  1. Arizona- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company who, for compensation, engages in the lease or rental of real estate in Arizona, who offers or lists real estate for rent or lease, who collects rent for the use of real estate or who negotiates the rental or leasing of Arizona real estate. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.
  1. Arkansas- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company who, for compensation, engages in the lease or rental of real estate in Arkansas, who offers or lists real estate for rent or lease, who collects rent for the use of real estate or who assists or directs in the negotiation of any transaction intended to result in the rent or lease of Arizona real estate. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

 

  1. California- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, leases or rents or offers to lease or rent, or places for rent, or solicits listing of places for rent, or solicits for prospective tenants, or negotiates the sale, purchase or exchanges of leases on real property, or on a business opportunity, or collects rents from real property, or improvements thereon, or from business opportunities. Businesses and Professions Code, Chapter 3, Article 1, Sec. 10131 (b). A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.
  1. Colorado- Yes, if the service offered as a property manager includes the negotiation of a lease or lease terms, an active real estate broker’s license is required. If a real estate broker who is in the employ of another broker conducts such management, all management must be conducted under the employing broker. The Colorado Real Estate Commission does not have any approved forms for leases or management agreements but it does have specific trust account and accounting requirements which brokers need to follow in handling security deposits and rental receipts. Brokers engaged in property management are also required to comply with the brokerage relationship section of the license law and applicable rules. Brokers must use the exclusive Right to Lease to establish an agency and/or Exclusive relationship with a property owner.
  1. Connecticut- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, rents or offers or attempts to negotiate the rental of an estate or interest in real estate, or collects or offers or attempts to collect rent for the use of real estate. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.
  1. Delaware- Yes. A broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, sells or offers to sell, or buys or to offers to buy, or negotiates the purchase, sale, or exchange of real estate or leases or rents or offers for rent any real estate, or negotiates leases or rental agreements. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.
  1. Florida- Yes. A property manager needs a sales or broker license if the compensation is paid by commission, and handling rentals and leases for others, not personally owned properties. There is not a “Property Manager” license or certificate. Also, certain rental properties need a license through the Div. of Hotels and Restaurants.

10. Georgia- Yes. A real estate broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, negotiates or attempts to negotiate, or assists in procuring prospects for the listing, renting or lease for any real estate or improvements, holds him or herself out as a referral agent for the purpose of securing prospects for the listing, renting or lease for any real estate, collects rents, assessments or other trust funds or attempts to collect rents, assessments, or other trust funds; or performs property management services or community association management services. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

“Property management services” means the provision, for compensation, of marketing, including referring prospective tenants; leasing; physical, administrative, or financial maintenance; and overall management of real property; or supervision of the above activities pursuant to a property management agreement.

11. Hawaii- Yes. A real estate broker’s license is required for any person or company that, for compensation, rents, or offers, attempts or agrees to the rental of any real property or who advertises or holds out to the public by any oral or printed solicitation or representation that she or her is engaged in the business of leasing or renting business enterprises or business opportunities or the real property of another, or leases, or who directs or assisting in the procuring of prospects or in the negotiation or closing of any transaction which does, or is calculated to, result in a leasing of real property; and all persons who advertise rental property information or lists. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

12. Idaho- No. A real estate broker’s license is not required. Property management is not a regulated activity in Idaho.

13. Illinois- Yes. A person needs a real estate license if they provide assistance which is in any way intended to result in the sale or lease of real estate. The definition of the word “broker” in the Illinois Real Estate Act provides 11 examples of the types of “assistance” that require a real estate -license. Included are: representing clients in the negotiation of real estate sales contracts or leases, and issuing advertisements for the sale, purchase or lease of real estate.

Therefore, property management activities that involve general administration, like contracting for property maintenance (garbage pick-up, etc.) and paying general expenses (utilities, etc.), do NOT require a real estate license. Serving as an accountant for association dues also does not require a real estate license.

Only those property management activities that involve a conveyance of real estate by contract or lease require a real estate license. Accordingly, property management activities that require a real estate license include: showing a unit for sale or lease, negotiating lease or real estate contract terms, maintaining security deposits, rent payments or earnest money deposits.

Illinois is unique in that it does allow property managers to obtain a “leasing agent” license to be used only for residential leasing activities. Leasing agents must be sponsored and employed by a sponsoring broker.

14. Indiana- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, manage, list, or negotiate or offer to perform any of those acts, her or she will need a real estate license. However, an individual involved in the renting of residential apartment units need not be licensed if he or she is employed or supervised by a licensed broker.

15. Iowa- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, manage, list, collect rent, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, prepare residential rental agreements, or offer to perform any of those acts, her or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

16. Kansas- No. According to the Kansas Department of Real Estate a broker’s license is not required to manage property if the property at issue is a residential property. As always, please confirm this information with your state real estate commission.

17. Kentucky- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, her or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

All active Kentucky real estate licensees are required to carry errors and omissions insurance as a condition of licensure.

18. Louisiana- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, her or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

19. Maine- No. Property management and/or rental matters are not matters which require a Maine Real Estate Commission License.

20. Maryland- No. Property management does not require a real estate license. However, if a person is licensed by the Commission, and they are doing property management, they are subject to the laws and regulations of the Commission.

21. Massachusetts- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, her or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities. (Chapter 112: Section 87PP).

22. Michigan- Yes. Under the Michigan Public Act, anyone who engages in property management must have a real estate broker’s license, unless they are a real estate salesperson employed by a real estate broker to engage in property management. Property management is defined as the leasing or renting, or the offering to lease or rent, of real property of others for a fee, commission, compensation, or other valuable consideration pursuant to a property management contract.

23. Minnesota- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

24. Mississippi- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, manage, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, her or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

25. Missouri-Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

26. Montana- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

27. Nebraska-Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, collect rents, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

28. Nevada- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, collect rents, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need either a salesperson’s OR broker’s license. In addition, he or she must obtain a property management permit.

29. New Hampshire- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, collect rents, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

30. New Jersey- Yes. If a property manager is going to rent, list, collect rents, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. 45:15-3. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

31. New Mexico- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, or list, he or she will need a broker’s license. According to the Real Estate Brokers statute, “Property Management” is defined as including – the showing, renting and leasing of real property, the collection and disbursement of funds on behalf of other persons, the supervision of employees as specified in the management agreement, the supervision of maintenance and repair work, handling of tenant relations, and/or preparation of financial reports. A “Property Manager” is defined as a broker – who, for a fee, salary, commission or other valuable consideration, is engaged in managing property for others.

32. New York- Yes. If a property manager is going to rent, list, negotiates the rental of property, or collect rents he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

A real estate management company needs a broker’s license if it collects rent or places tenants in vacant spaces on behalf of a landlord client. If services are strictly maintenance, a broker’s license is not required.

33. North Carolina- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, or list, or offers to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

34. North Dakota- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

35. Ohio- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, procure prospects or negotiate, assist, or offer to perform any of those acts, or if he or she operates, manages or rents any building or portions of buildings to the public as tenants (other than a custodian, caretaker or janitor) he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

36. Oklahoma- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, list, solicit for prospective tenants, solicit listings of places for rent or lease, or negotiate or attempt to negotiate to perform any of those acts, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

37. Oregon-Yes. The following individuals may engage in the management of rental real estate:

  • A licensed real estate broker, under the supervision of a licensed principal real estate broker
  • A licensed principal real estate broker
  • A licensed property manager

A licensed property manager is only authorized to engage in the management of rental real estate and is not authorized to engage in other professional real estate activity for another for compensation including, but not limited to, purchases, sales and exchanges of real estate.

38. Pennsylvania- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, list or manage real estate, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

39. Rhode Island- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, list or rent real estate, or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in those activities he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

40. South Carolina- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease or list real estate, or negotiate or attempt to negotiate to perform any of those acts, or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in any of those activities, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

In South Carolina a “property manager” is defined as an individual, who, for a fee, salary, or commission, or other valuable consideration or who with the intent or expectation of receiving compensation:

  • Negotiates or attempts to negotiate the rental or leasing of real estate or improvements thereon;
  • Lists or offers to list and provide services in connection with the leasing or rental of real estate or improvements thereon;
  • Advertises or otherwise holds himself out to the public as being engaged in any of the foregoing activities.

A “property manager in charge” is the property manager who has responsibility for the actions of the associate property managers and who has responsibility and control over and liability for trust accounts.

41. South Dakota- No. But if a property manager is going to negotiate the rent, exchange or leasing of a property, list or rent real estate, or collect rent for real estate or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in those activities he or she will need at least a “property manager’s license”, which is a type of “restricted broker’s license”. Individuals must be licensed as individual property managers and partnerships, associations or corporations must be licensed as firms.

42. Tennessee- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease or list real estate, or negotiate or attempt to negotiate to perform any of those acts, or collect rent or attempt to collect rent, or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in any of those activities, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

43. Texas- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease or list real estate, or negotiate or attempt to negotiate to perform any of those acts, or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in any of those activities, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

44. Utah- Yes. A Broker license is required for any individual who, for another and for valuable consideration, engages in property management including advertising real estate for lease or rent, procuring prospective tenants or lessees, negotiating lease or rental terms, executing lease or rental agreements. The licensing requirement does not apply to an owner who manages his or her own property, an employee for one property owner, apartment managers who reside in the apartments at reduced rent, full-time salaried employees of a Homeowners Association, hotel or motel management, or management activities associated with rental accommodations for a period of less than 30 consecutive days. A Sales Agent working for a Broker may also engage in such acts.

 

45. Vermont- No. Not if the property manager is going to just be dealing with rental properties.

46. Virginia- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease or offer to lease, or rent or offer for rent, any real estate or improvement on real estate, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities. (� 54.1-2100.)

47. Washington-Yes

48. West Virginia- Yes. If a property manager is going to lease, rent, manage, or list real estate, or negotiate or attempt to negotiate to perform any of those acts, or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in any of those activities, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities.

49. Wisconsin- Yes. If a property manager is going to negotiate, or offer to negotiate the rental of an interest in real estate, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities

50. Wyoming- Yes. If a property manager is going to rent, manage or lease, or offer to rent, manage or lease real estate, or negotiate or attempt to negotiate to perform any of those acts, or list real estate for lease, or collect, offer or attempt to collect rent, or if he or she holds herself out as engaging in any of those activities, he or she will need a broker’s license. A salesperson working under a broker may engage in such activities. (33-28-102).

Here’s how to Trademark your catch phrase or signature saying.

June 6, 2011 § Leave a comment

So you have the vision, idea, and plans in place. What can you do next that will help set you apart from other businesses not only in your market, but in all of business? I bet you can name hundreds of signature sayings from Fortune 500 companies, or celebrities. What these businesses and celebrities are doing is they are branding their unique image and using those sayings to represent a way to stay current fresh in the minds of people. In order to stay on top they protect their brand from others, and that’s where signature saying trademarking comes in.

A trademark is a: word, phrase, symbol or design, or a combination that helps the public to identify a good or product, especially to distinguish them from those of competitors. By being approved for a legal trademark you are protecting your image and the saying that you want to be known for. Coming up with a great saying is only half the work; the other half is protecting it. Without the protection of a trademark your signature saying is up for grabs.

The process of trademarking a signature saying:

  1. Search for conflicting trademarks- Visit http://tess2.uspto.gov/ to find make sure your signature saying is not taken
  2. Apply to register your trademark- Visit http://www.uspto.gov/trademarks/teas/index.jsp to apply
  3. 3.    Wait for a response- The process can take up to 6 months, so be patient and expect that issues may arise during this process
  4. Receive trademark approval- You will receive either a Certificate of Registration or a Notice of Allowance.  If your mark is finally refused, you will receive notice of the refusal

It should be noted that not all signature sayings can be trademarked, below are common reason they may be refused:

  • Resembles a current trademark
  • Consists of immoral, deceptive or scandalous matter;
  • Merely descriptive of goods/services
  • Disparages or falsely suggests a connection with persons living or dead, institutions, beliefs or national symbols
  • A geographic term
  • Merely a surname

In closing, you’ve done the hard part; you’ve come up with a great signature saying. Don’t be remembered for what you didn’t do by not getting your signature trademarked, be remembered for what you did do and how you want to be relevant.

 

Brenton Hayden

Serial Entrepreneur – See my resume here

An Entrepreneur does not need millions of dollars to succeed! Just passion for your business!

June 1, 2011 § Leave a comment

Entrepreneurship requires taking a risk in hopes of a succeeding with one great idea or concept. Most look at the current economy as slow and without opportunity. It is up to you to either embrace change or wait for change to embrace to you, but it is change that opens new opportunities where others previously did not exist.

Starting a small business does not require millions of dollars, but it does require a strong belief in your business idea. Many small businesses have started out of homes with their own personal computers, and sometimes as a side job to help subsidize a full time job. However with a great idea all of that can change within a matter of a few months. All it takes are a few sales,  and a little market presence and you are on your way.

As soon as your business idea starts to take off you may want to consider if you need help taking your business to the next level. I have the mentality that I do not hire for a positions, I recruit for them. By that I mean I look for people with the positive qualities I deem are necessary to fit into my business plan and in my office. Prior experience in a field is a plus, but it is the personal qualities that get you noticed.

You should always be prepared to change and improve processes along the way with your business. Whether it is something you did not think of or just an easier way to provide your service, but the saying keeps it simple goes a long way in business. Stick to what you know best without trying to cover all areas of a market, and focus on the idea that got your business going.

 

Brenton Hayden – Serial Entrepreneur

 

Here’s my resume: http://www.Brenton-Hayden.com

 

To learn more about Brenton’s companies visit:

RentersWarehouse: http://www.renterswarehouse.com/default.asp

Pink-Blue Realty: http://www.pink-blue.com/

EFlatFeeRealEstate: http://www.eflatfeerealestate.com/

How to build a team of employees! Hiring tips for property managers!

March 29, 2011 § Leave a comment

As Entrepreneur and CEO:  How I Build my Team of Employees

A recent survey from one of the nation’s largest staffing firms showed that the top three aspects that employers are looking for in a new hire are:

1) credible work history (97 percent),

2) job experience (88 percent),

3) specific skills (87 percent).

 

As owner and CEO of a rapidly growing business, here’s what I look for when hiring people for my team:

 

Results

I think that truly driven, passionate people leave behind them a wake of results wherever they go. Candidates that can tell me a story about how they got something done, against all odds, really impresses me the most.

Good fit

I have interviewed candidates that have excellent skills but they weren’t the best candidate.  It’s important that I feel they are a good fit with the rest of the team and that they possess similar attributes, attitudes and the ability to communicate well with each other.

Preparation

It’s impressive when a candidate asks great questions about the company. It demonstrates not only their interest in our company and the issues we’re facing, but also their research skills.

Initiative

It’s important for me to hire people that can be proactive, function independently and find a way to get things done.  Be a creative, proactive problem solver.  It’s important for me to know how the candidate can fill the needs of my company.

Sense of humor

The business of property management can be stressful at times.  A good sense of humor is a “must have” to get through those stressful days.  If a new candidate tends to take things a little too seriously, they can burn out too fast and not be happy in the position.

Passion

Passion is energy, drive, motivation and commitment. Candidates who are infused with this quality demonstrate an enthusiasm and aliveness that is contagious to their colleagues and clients. People that are willing to ‘go the extra mile’ to assure that everything is done well are a huge asset to the company.

Professionalism

A candidate that demonstrates professionalism at the interview will most likely demonstrate that professionalism when working directly with clients.  Do they present themselves with confidence, do they show enthusiasm and motivation for the position, are the really listening to the questions and answering accordingly, do they offer a hand shake as they introduce themselves?

 

At Renters Warehouse, we value all of our tenants and property owners.  We continually strive to provide you the service and tools to make life a little easier. Visit www.renterswarehouse.com to learn more about the company, our properties, our services and its CEO, Brenton Hayden.

 

TUNE IN EVERY SUNDAY FROM 8AM TO 9AM AS I’LL BE YOUR HOST ON FM 100.3 Fox News Talk. “All Things Real Estate Radio” is a call in show with a panel of residential and commercial real estate experts discussing the latest news, trends that affect you and the real estate market today. www.KTLKRealEstate.com.  Renters Warehouse is proudly endorsed by Glenn Beck, the 2nd most watched show on television and the 3rd most listened to radio personality in America!

 

# # #

Property management in MN – specializing in tenant placement, monthly property management and project management with a niche market of unintentional landlords by providing services that help people keep their homes, rent them and create rental income with less stress.

Also check out  Brenton’s new daily deals website at www.RWPerks.com

 

Brenton Hayden wins “Young Entreprenuer of 2010″ by Minneapolis St Paul Business Journal

March 16, 2011 § Leave a comment

 

 

Most employees at Brenton Hayden’s property-management firm, Renters Warehouse, were hired with no experience in that role.

“Most of them come in as shoe salespeople, or mattress salespeople, or cell phone salespeople,” Hayden said, not mentioning his vice president, formerly a pilot, and assistant vice president, formerly a suit salesperson. “I know they can to sell, just not in real estate. So I teach them real estate.”

That’s not surprising, given Hayden’s success himself in dropping into new fields.

He sold Kellogg’s products to grocery stores when he was still a teenager, worked as a real estate agent for Coldwell Banker Burnet and now owns four different businesses: a residential property-management company called Renters Warehouse, a residential real estate brokerage called Pink/Blue, a limousine service called Sexy Limousines, and a mechanical contractor called Zooz Furnace & Duct Cleaning. All four firms are based in Golden Valley.

Hayden, 25, projects revenue of $2.24 million in 2010 for all four firms. The companies employ 12 people and 15 independent contractors. Hayden has expanded his Golden Valley headquarters — in an office building tucked behind a Taco Bell north of Interstate 394 — from 800 square feet to 4,000 square feet in the past year. Hayden also produces a residential real estate-themed radio show that airs weekly on WWTC-AM 1280, The Patriot.

“I get hit with a lot of opportunities, and I get excited about them,” Hayden said. “I get bored with companies. When I had Renters Warehouse [up and] going, it was good, but it wasn’t new any more, so I looked for other things. I’ve never been afraid of work.”

Hayden didn’t attend college.

In high school, he worked his way up from a grocery stock boy to shift supervisor at a Lunds store. There he got to know the local Kellogg sales representative, who told him about a part-time opening stocking shelves for the Battle Creek, Mich.-based company. Kellogg eventually hired him on as a full-time territory manager at 19, and Hayden won Territory Manager of the Quarter all four quarters he worked. He also was Rookie of the Year in sales for the entire company.

He received a promotion, but resigned shortly thereafter, citing company politics. He said his own lavish lifestyle, which included a penthouse apartment and a new BMW, used up the severance pay in a few months.

Hayden eventually took out a $3,000 loan from his father to buy a laptop and take a three-week real estate licensing course.

After short stints at Counselor Realty Inc. and then Coldwell Banker Burnet, Hayden started his first company.

When the real estate market soured in 2006, he decided to focus on rental properties, changing the name to Renters Warehouse, which now both fills rental properties and offers flat-fee property-management services.

“If he gets the right vision in his head, he really goes after it,” Renters Warehouse vice president Kevin Ortner said. “Once he gets that spark, he has a knack for marketing right and making it happen.”

Hayden’s latest plan is to expand Renters Warehouse into other markets such as Arizona, where it launched in the spring of 2009.

“I think it’ll spread like wild weeds,” he said. “It’s a new undertaking, and that’s really thrilling for me.”

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